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Reject false report claiming Ghana is second most corrupt in Africa – Mahama 

John Mahama

President John Mahama is alarmed by a “false interpretation” put on a Transparency International report, suggesting Ghana is the second most corrupt country in Africa.

Media reports stated that the report put Ghana second to South Africa in terms of corruption.
But Mr Mahama said the claim is false and caused a bad image to be created for the country.

He disclosed this at a high-level meeting on the National Anti-Corruption Action Plan in Accra Wednesday.
“This is absolutely false, and for emphasis, this is absolutely false,” he declared.

“Not only did the conversation [created by media reports] end up misleading the public, it indeed also give our country undeserved negative image amongst the comity of nations and the international community as a whole”, he bemoaned.

President Mahama reiterated, “And it is absolutely false that Ghana is the second most corrupt country in Africa, we reject it completely.”
He noted that the report was based on a survey on subjective views of people and not a research, but was “wrongly interpreted” by the media including the state-owned Daily Graphic.
President Mahama was not amused some leading political figures, including running mate of Nana Akufo-Addo, Dr. Mahamudu Bawumia latched onto it despite attempts by institutions that sponsored the survey to correct the misinterpretation.
“What can be the motivation for a section of our population to be so obsessed with trying to claim such an undignified title for ourselves at the expense of our nation’s dignity and our international image,” the president wondered.
To such people, Mr. Mahama prayed “I leave the matter to their consciences”.
Mr Mahama also issued a strong warning to MMDCEs who fail to implement directives on curbing corruption at the assemblies.
Deputy Commissioner on Human Rights and Administrative Justice, Richard Quayson charged public officials to be accountable to the people they serve.

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